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Global Horror and Monster Cinema: Reference Materials - Periodicals and Journals

This is a resource guide for academic research in the global horror and monster cinema field of study.

Academic Resources - Periodicals and Journals

This is a section of resources that cover the horror film genre. Here you will find academic periodicals and journals that cover a wide variety of topics that relate to the analysis of the horror film. There are also a few resources that cover how to generally write about film in an academic setting. 

All resources can be found from the Butler Irwin Library Journal Database section.

Each resource below is linked directly to the article's home database. To expand your search use the Butler WorldCat search bar.

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Global spectrologies: Contemporary Thai horror films and the globalization of the supernatural

Title: Global spectrologies: Contemporary Thai horror films and the globalization of the supernatural

Author: Katarzyna Ancuta

Journal: Horror Studies, Mar 2011, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p131-144. 14p.

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

If we agree that globalization translates into a quick and massive flow of capital, people, products, services and ideas across borders then cinema has been a global enterprise since its very beginnings. While local film industries may not share the global distributing potential of Hollywood, this does not mean that their production and post-production methods lag behind. The case of Thai film is not so different here, negotiating the dynamics of the global (e.g. filming equipment, skilled crew, or distribution formats) and the local (e.g. conceptualization, scriptwriting, or narrative formation). Contemporary Thai horror film has long been Thailand's calling card on international film markets. Known in Thai as nung phii (ghost films), the films remain faithful to their narrow supernatural formula focusing most commonly on the figure of a vindictive phii tai hong (a spirit of the violently dead). Recently, however, the familiar anthropomorphic renditions of ghosts known from older Thai horror films seem to undergo the steady process of de-materialization and de-literalization, challenged through the intervention of technology and reappearing as critically constructed metaphors. This article argues that this change in the way these ghosts are portrayed on film can be seen as a result of the increasing globalization of Thai film industry per se, as well as a reflection on the broader economic, political and social transformations brought about by the powers of globalization in Thailand. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

The Cabin in the Woods and the End of American Exceptionalism.

Title: The Cabin in the Woods and the End of American Exceptionalism.

Author: Andrew L. Cooper

Journal: Slayage, Fall 2013 / Winter 2014, Vol. 36/37 Issue 2/1, p21-40. 20p.

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

The article critiques the film "The Cabin in the Woods" directed by Joss Whedon, which explores the end of exceptionalism in America. Topics mentioned include the reputation of Whedon on genre convention manipulation, the expectation to be an anthesis of a formulaic film, and the presentation on the exceptional abilities and place of the presumptousness and arrogance of America.

Terror in Horror Genres: The Global Media and the Millennial Zombie.

Title: Terror in Horror Genres: The Global Media and the Millennial Zombie.

Author: Nicole Birch-Bayley

Journal: Journal of Popular Culture, Dec 2012, Vol. 45 Issue 6, p1137-1151. 15p.

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

The article presents an analysis of zombie films, an aspect of the horror genre, focusing on ways in which such films made in the 21st century have represented themes of global concern and terrorism. Particular attention is given to the influence of horror director George Romero on the zombie film sub-genre. Several films are analyzed including "28 Days Later," directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Noah Huntley, and Naomie Harris, "Dawn of the Dead," a 2004 remake of the original Romero film directed by Zack Snyder, and "Diary of the Dead," directed by Romero.

Transnational spectres and regional spectators: Flexible citizenship in new Chinese horror cinema.

Title: Transnational spectres and regional spectators: Flexible citizenship in new Chinese horror cinema.

Author: Jennifer Feeley

Journal: Journal of Chinese Cinema, 2012, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p41-64. 24p.

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary: 

Chinese horror's participation in the turn-of-the-millennium Asian horror boom has been largely pan-Asian. This article focuses on one such endeavour, Kelvin Tong's The Maid (2005), a MediaCorp Raintree co-production from Singapore, Hong Kong and the Philippines that has been billed Singapore's first home-grown international horror film. I argue that The Maid uses the horror genre to construct a cultural Chineseness based on a flattening of Confucian, Taoist and Buddhist aesthetics. Placing The Maid in the context of recent Asian horror films, this article investigates the various processes involved in the production, distribution and consumption of new Chinese horror, particularly how it functions as a regional genre that contests the notion of national cinema and problematizes the Sinophone. I contend that it is through the erasure of Singapore's non-Chinese cultural elements that the film aligns itself with regional Chinese horror and the international phenomenon of new Asian horror. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

'Re-Imagining' Hegemony and Misogyny in the Contemporary Slasher Remake.

Title: 'Re-Imagining' Hegemony and Misogyny in the Contemporary Slasher Remake.

Author: Ryan Lizardi

Journal: Journal of Popular Film & Television, Fall 2010, Vol. 38 Issue 3, p113-121. 9p

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

Recently, cinema has been inundated with 1970s/1980s 'slasher' horror canon 're-imaginings,' such as Halloween (2007). Comparing remakes to originals, the remake texts allegorically address contemporary concerns and power structures. Cultural implications of slasher remakes include hyperemphasis of the originals' hegemony and misogyny. Ironically, the remakes contain optimistic endings, pointing to hegemonic, misogynistic futures. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

When Horror Gets Personal

Title: When Horror Gets Personal

Author: Jacob Krueger

Journal: Movie Maker,  Fall 2015, Vol. 22 Issue 115, p30-31. 2p.

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

The article discusses how horror screenwriters in the U.S. write great horror movies. It suggests writing a horror story that will relate to the experiences of lives, fears, and anxieties. It notes the need to find a theme that is already significant to the personal life. It mentions that personal theme can hold a genre film together.

Godzilla and the Japanese Nightmare: When "Them!" Is U.S.

Title: Godzilla and the Japanese Nightmare: When "Them!" Is U.S.

Author: Chon Noriega

Journal: Cinema Journal Vol. 27, No. 1 (Autumn, 1987), pp. 63-77

Database: Irwin Library JSTOR

Summary:

This essay takes a look at the impact "Godzilla" had on the Japanese culture in the post-atomic world. It endeavors to look closely at how the world viewed the atomic attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the introduction of the nuclear monster. The essay also takes a look at how the U.S. responded both culturally and in film.

The Subject of Torture: Regarding the Pain of Americans in Hostel

 
Author: Jason Middleton
 
Journal: Cinema Journal Vol. 49, No. 4 (Summer 2010), pp. 1-24

Database: Irwin Library JSTOR

Summary:

This essay analyzes the contemporary American horror film Eli Roth's "Hostel" and how it relates to George W. Bush's war on terror. This essay argues that at first the film is critiquing America's use of torture, but ultimately excuses the act.

Writing about film - Periodicals and Journals

The following resources cover how to academically write about film and film criticism

Introduction: Film Theory in the Age of Neoliberal Globalization.

Title: Introduction: Film Theory in the Age of Neoliberal Globalization.

Author: Masha Salazkina

Journal: Framework: The Journal of Cinema & Media, Fall 2015, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p325-349. 25p.

Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

An essay is presented related to global neoliberalism in film industry. Topics discussed include understanding and practicing transnationalism for scholarship in film industry, putting scholars discourse the use of their superior funding and the English language for research, and geopolitics and scholarly and social engagement in film industry.

The New Language of the Digital Film.

Title: The New Language of the Digital Film.

Author: Orit Fussfeld Cohen

Journal: Journal of Popular Film & Television, 2014, Vol. 42 Issue 1, p47-58. 12p

Database: Database: Irwin Library EBSCO Host Film & Television Literature Index with Full Text

Summary:

The language of the digital film entails an intermediation process between new technological capacities that provide the infinite potential to control cinematic manifestations, and new expressive intentions on the part of the digital filmmaker to produce an invented realism that suggests an auratic power. The unique aesthetics of the digital film reflect this power, expressing the ways digital filmmakers envision or shape invented worlds rather than striving to reproduce an actual and physical world. The characters in digital action films reveal this new determination in ways that have been equated with avatars in the video game context. The journey of the digital heroic action-body through spectacles of physical endurance evidences his manipulation from a position of control and mastery aimed mainly at heightening the impact of the action and functions on an expressive rather than a realist level. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

Film Language

Title: Film Language

Author: Edward W. Hudlin

Journal: The Journal of Aesthetic Education Vol. 13, No. 2 (Apr., 1979), pp. 47-56

Database: Irwin Library JSTOR

Summary:

In what follows I will survey briefly some of the claims made about the presumed nature of film as language and some of the problems that arise. I will consider three views of film as language: two from the most influential critical school of the past, the Russian formalists (I. V. Pudovkin and Sergei Eisenstein), and one from the most influential contemporary school of film criticism, the British semiologists as repre- sented by the writings of Peter Wollen.

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