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e-Portfolios: Introduction

What is an e-Portfolio?

To start, we must understand what a portfolio is. As Melody Kruzic explains it, a portfolio is a "compilation of work samples and professional documentation that provides proof of your accomplishments or samples of your work". Traditionally, a portfolio would be a physical, paper version of your work. However, as technology advances, the use of the electronic portfolios (known as e-portfolios), has gained popularity. Whether paper or electronic, these portfolios allow professors easy access to your work--and progress--over your career as a student. Professors can find areas of strength and areas of struggle, allowing them to tailor their lessons to the needs of their students, providing useful commentary and guidance. 

In this Libguide, you will find articles explaining the benefits of having a portfolio, some helpful tips on starting your own, and some inspiration--for when you are feeling overwhelmed or lost. 

Types of e-Portfolios

Portfolios generally take three forms: reflective, showcase, and/or assessment. When writing reflective portfolios, students evaluate their own performance and self-identify gaps therein; document their professional, and occasionally personal, values and beliefs and changes over time; and connect theoretical ideas to applied practice. In showcase portfolios, students self-select artifacts representing their best works; showcase portfolios document students’ achievements and may include work samples for future employment. For assessment portfolios, students document how their achieved learning outcomes and may be asked to include specific rather than self-selected artifacts on their portfolios. While some portfolios use a single form, e.g. a reflective portfolio, other portfolios may serve multiple purposes and combine two or all forms.

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