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HST 352: American InJustice (Deno): The Prison as a Social History of the US: Home

This guide serves to assist HST 352 students in navigating various media in order to execute social justice research. It will also support students in various assignments throughout the semester.

Other Resources

Key Books on Injustice

HST 352: American InJustice

The Prison as a Social History of the US

About This Guide

This guide serves to assist HST 352 students in navigating various media in order to execute social justice research in order to support students in their various assignments and projects this semester. The guide contains a variety of podcasts, books, articles, and databases that encompass the many facets of injustice in the prison system, prison industrial complex and the Black Lives Matter movement. Additionally, it will take a critical look at the state of Indianapolis and the prison system within it.

What is Injustice?

According to Merriam-Webster, injustice is the "violation of right or of the rights of another." Today, injustice has taken on many different forms. For the purposes of this course and LibGuide, we will be looking at injustices committed in the context of the prison system. The United States has the highest incarceration rates on an international scale with over 2.2 million people in the nation's prisons and jails. This population is a 500% increase over the last 40 years. Mass incarceration has contributed largely to this and disproportionately affects certain populations. Today, people of color make up 37% of the US population but 67% of the prison population. Black men are six times more likely to be incarcerated than white men and Hispanic men are more than twice as like to be incarcerated as non-Hispanic white men. 

The purpose of this LibGuide is to examine why this occurs and what actions can be taken to correct these, among other unfair and inequitable trends, in the prison system.

Leaders in Fighting Injustice

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Meet Josh!

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Josh Petrusa
Contact:
Josh Petrusa
Associate Dean for Collections & Digital Services
Irwin 327
317.940.9236

Petrusa Instruction Evaluation

Information Commons Graduate Assistant

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Sarah Braunstein
Contact:
317-940-9227

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