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Remote Teaching Strategies for JCA: Dance: Performance

The show must go on.

Dance: Performance

Resource Recommendations by Tier

In order to most effectively share resources for the various Dance Performance courses, the Center for Academic Technology has broken down the Dance Performance curriculum into the following tiers:

Tier 1: Movement Based Classes

DA 119, DA 120, DA 121, DA 122, DA 123, DA 124, DA 131, DA 132, DA 141, DA 142, DA 223, DA 224, DA 231, DA 232, DA 233, DA 241, DA 242, DA 247, DA 248, DA 321, DA 322, DA 331, DA 332, DA 341, DA 342, DA 431, DA 432.

Tier 1 courses include classes that involve choreography and other largely movement based elements; however, no use of equipment such as a barre.

Tier 2: Lecture Classes

DA 109, DA 110, DA 161, DA 162, DA 166, DA 261, DA 263, DA 264, DA 361, DA 362, DA 365W, DA 366C, DA 466C, DA 471, DA 472, DA 474, DA 476, DA 492.

Tier 2 courses include classes that are rooted in theory and are trended more towards discussion and lectures. They are less difficult to convert to a digital format.

Tier 3: Technique Classes

DA 111, DA 112, DA 113, DA 114, DA 213, DA 214, DA 215, DA 216, DA 219, DA 220, DA 315, DA 316, DA 317, DA 318, DA 319, DA 320, DA 410, DA 417, DA 418, DA 419, DA 240.

Tier 3 courses are made up of elements that one simply does not typically at home. These elements include components such as a barre or other equipment. DA

Tier 4: Group Work

DA 125, DA 126, DA 151, DA 152, DA 225, DA 226, DA 251, DA 252, DA 325, DA 326, DA 351, DA 352, DA 451, DA 452.

Tier 4 courses are classes that involve heavy group participation.

Tier 5: Experience-Based 

DA 190, DA 290, DA 390, DA 490.

Classes involving a performance viewing component.

Tier 1: Movement Based Classes

Tier 1 courses include classes that involve choreography and other largely movement based elements; however, no use of equipment such as a barre.

DA 119, DA 120, DA 121, DA 122, DA 123, DA 124, DA 131, DA 132, DA 141, DA 142, DA 223, DA 224, DA 231, DA 232, DA 233, DA 241, DA 242, DA 247, DA 248, DA 321, DA 322, DA 331, DA 332, DA 341, DA 342, DA 431, DA 432.

 

Synchronous Learning

Some instructors may choose to have meetings at a consistent time each week that involve the class meeting on a digital format.

 

There are many beneficial features to synchronous learning including increased classroom engagement, and an increased opportunity to interact with your professor. In addition to these beneficial features, there are some disadvantages to practicing synchronous learning. These include a rigid schedule that is not easily adaptable for the chaotic new world students have entered into and technical difficulties can occur more easily.

 

Synchronous Streaming

Zoom: Zoom is a web-based communication technology that has the capacity to conduct video conferencing, annotate meetings, facilitate breakout rooms, and can record and download meetings. It supports both audio and video.

Hangouts: Hangouts is a unified communication system, similar to Zoom, that allows members to initiate and participate in text, voice or video chats. It can be used on both iOS and Android devices.

Teams: Microsoft Teams can be blended directly into your Canvas course and allows students to be able to meet similarly to Zoom.

 

Asynchronous Learning

Another way to conduct courses this semester is through asynchronous learning. Asynchronous learning is delivered via forums, videos, emails, and messages where students will complete lessons on their own, though typically with a set of weekly or daily due dates.

 

Similar to synchronous learning, asynchronous learning has both pros and cons. Synchronous learning is ideal for students who need a more flexible schedule and to avoid technical errors; however, students who lack motivation may discover that the low levels of interaction make completing work more difficult. Asynchronous learning and its success is largely dependent on the individual and their work ethic.

 

Video Recording

Microsoft Stream: Microsoft Stream is a service that allows students and instructors upload, view, and share videos securely. It can be used to share recordings of classes, as well as to share videos of progress. Microsoft Stream has been used by Butler students before including Emma Smith. Below are some examples of video she’s made via Microsoft Stream:

Panopto: Panopto is a software solution that allows the recording of audio/video content, as well as includes a web-based editor. It is useful for recording lectures that students can view on their own time, as well as for students to upload video submission of their work directly to the course.

 

Discussion Forums

Canvas: Canvas is a cloud-based learning management system that Butler adopted in Spring 2019. It has many tools that could be useful for teaching an asynchronous class. Discussion boards allow professors and students to “discuss” a lecture, offer feedback to other students, and share audio/video. Instructors can also grade Canvas discussions.

  • Ashlee Espinosa, an actor, director, and educator, offers insight into how to adapt a Canvas course to benefit theatre classes.

FlipGrid: Flipgrid is a website that allows teachers to create “grids” to host video discussions. Teachers can post questions or prompts which are called “topics,” and then students can post video responses that appear in the tiled grid display. It is useful for sharing videos that could be a response to a dance “prompt” or for students to give feedback on each other’s assignments.

Tier 2: Lecture Classes

Tier 2 courses include classes that are rooted in theory and are trended more towards discussion and lectures. They are less difficult to convert to a digital format.

DA 109, DA 110, DA 161, DA 162, DA 166, DA 261, DA 263, DA 264, DA 361, DA 362, DA 365W, DA 366C, DA 466C, DA 471, DA 472, DA 474, DA 476, DA 492.

 

Lecture classes can take place utilizing the same resources listed in Tier 1. In addition to these resources, there are many ways to engage lecture-based dance classes.

 

Synchronous Engagement

Kahoot: Kahoot is a game-based learning platform that allows instructors to create games and quizzes for review that can be screenshared via Zoom or Teams synchronously, and promotes engagement. This is useful for spicing up any lecture.

PollEverywhere: PollEverywhere allows students to use their mobile phones or laptops to respond to polls synchronously or asynchronously. PollEverywhere is useful for gathering student feedback and has the potential to work well with larger class sizes.

 

Lecture Class Resources

Anatomy and Physiology of Dancers: This resource does an excellent job of explaining the movements a dancer often makes while performing.

Arts Alive: This website allows users to utilize various modules about elements of dance composition to put together a dance. These modules include interactive tutorials.

ZSR Library: ZSR Library has created a list of useful websites about the history of dance.

Tier 3: Technique Classes

Tier 3 courses are made up of elements that one simply does not typically at home. These elements include components such as a barre or other equipment.

DA 111, DA 112, DA 113, DA 114, DA 213, DA 214, DA 215, DA 216, DA 219, DA 220, DA 315, DA 316, DA 317, DA 318, DA 319, DA 320, DA 410, DA 417, DA 418, DA 419, DA 240.

 

Despite the disappointing reality of no longer having access to resources that instructors typically would have, there are many ways to adapt technique classes to an online/remote format.

 

Use a Chair: In this full barre workout composed by Jessica Smith, she shows how a chair found at home can be utilized in place of a ballet barre.

Yoga Mats and Zoom: In this article, Sarah Wroth briefly explains how Indiana University’s School of Music has adapted its ballet classes to the online format.

Dance Studio at Home: In this video produced by STEEZY, there is a tutorial for making a relatively cheap dance studio space at home.

Tier 4: Group Work

Tier 4 courses are classes that involve heavy group participation.

DA 125, DA 126, DA 151, DA 152, DA 225, DA 226, DA 251, DA 252, DA 325, DA 326, DA 351, DA 352, DA 451, DA 452.

 

Ensembles are so exciting due to the ability to interact with other dancers. Unfortunately, the best solution at this point is being “together apart.” Some potential synchronous options include:

 

Zoom: Zoom is a web-based communication technology that has the capacity to conduct video conferencing, annotate meetings, facilitate breakout rooms, and can record and download meetings. It supports both audio and video.

 

Teams: Microsoft Teams can be blended directly into your Canvas course and allows students to be able to meet similarly to Zoom.

Additional Dance Resources

  • Katie Sopoci Drake, a professor at the School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, has composed an article with adaptive strategies for teaching dance online.
  • Mila Parrish, a professor of the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance at the University of North Carolina Greensboro has put together a list of tools and tricks for digitally teaching dance pedagogy.
  • In this article, composed by Doug Risner of Wayne State University, Risner explores how to design and create an internship course in dance and how to evaluate it. Although intended for in person implementation, the syllabus and themes of the article could be applied to students offering online instruction with the oversight of an instructor. This is a potential replacement possibility for student teaching and could have an ICR component.
  • This article, also written by Doug Risner, Risner explores strategies for instructors giving feedback on Online Dance Courses. This document could not only serve to give criteria for grading, but also inspire assignments for an online dance course.

Additional Dance Resources

  • Katie Sopoci Drake, a professor at the School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, has composed an article with adaptive strategies for teaching dance online.
  • Mila Parrish, a professor of the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance at the University of North Carolina Greensboro has put together a list of tools and tricks for digitally teaching dance pedagogy.
  • In this article, composed by Doug Risner of Wayne State University, Risner explores how to design and create an internship course in dance and how to evaluate it. Although intended for in person implementation, the syllabus and themes of the article could be applied to students offering online instruction with the oversight of an instructor. This is a potential replacement possibility for student teaching and could have an ICR component.
  • This article, also written by Doug Risner, Risner explores strategies for instructors giving feedback on Online Dance Courses. This document could not only serve to give criteria for grading, but also inspire assignments for an online dance course.

CONTACT

Email Butler University Libraries
Irwin Library: 317-940-9227
Science Library: 317-940-9937
CAT: 317-940-8575

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