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Remote Teaching Strategies for JCA: Instrumental Performance

The show must go on.

Music Performance: Instrumental

Resource Recommendations by Tier

In order to most effectively share resources for the various Instrumental Music Performance courses, the Center for Academic Technology has broken down the Instrumental Music Performance curriculum into the following tiers:

 

Tier 1: Lecture Classes

MT 101, MT 111, MT 102, MT 112, MH 308, MT 201, MT 211, MT 202, MT 212, MH 305, ME 330, MH 306, MT 311, MT 413, MH 307, ME (tech elective), ME 407, MT 308, MH (upper-level elective), ME 430, MH (upper-level elective), MT (upper-level elective) 

 

Tier 1 courses include classes that are rooted in theory and are trended more towards discussion and lectures. They are less difficult to convert to a digital format.

 

Tier 2: In-Person Classes

AM 021, AM (Lessons), AM 022, AM 023, AM 024, ES 101 (Chamber)

 

Tier 2 courses include classes that involve performing in groups of two or more, and require equipment or in-person interactions.

 

Tier 3: Juries, Upper-Divisionals, and Recital Classes

AM 299, AM 300, AM 400, Juries take place every semester there isn’t a recital or upper divisional

Tier 3 courses are made up of courses taken as a “final exam” for performance majors. These often require a piano accompaniment, but can be recorded at home/in a recital hall, etc.

 

Tier 4: Group Work

ES (SB, WE, or BSO)

 

Tier 4 courses are classes that involve heavy group participation.

Tier 1: Lecture Classes

Tier 1 courses include classes that are rooted in theory and are trended more towards discussion and lectures. They are less difficult to convert to a digital format.

MT 101, MT 111, MT 102, MT 112, MH 308, MT 201, MT 211, MT 202, MT 212, MH 305, ME 330, MH 306, MT 311, MT 413, MH 307, ME (tech elective), ME 407, MT 308, MH (upper-level elective), ME 430, MH (upper-level elective), MT (upper-level elective) 

 

Synchronous Learning

Some instructors may choose to have meetings at a consistent time each week that involve the class meeting on a digital format.

There are many beneficial features to synchronous learning including increased classroom engagement, and an increased opportunity to interact with your professor. In addition to these beneficial features, there are some disadvantages to practicing synchronous learning. These include a rigid schedule that is not easily adaptable for the chaotic new world students have entered into and technical difficulties can occur more easily.

 

Synchronous Streaming

Zoom: Zoom is a web-based communication technology that has the capacity to conduct video conferencing, annotate meetings, facilitate breakout rooms, and can record and download meetings. It supports both audio and video.

Hangouts: Hangouts is a unified communication system, similar to Zoom, that allows members to initiate and participate in text, voice or video chats. It can be used on both iOS and Android devices.

Teams: Microsoft Teams can be blended directly into your Canvas course and allows students to be able to meet similarly to Zoom.

 

Synchronous Engagement

Kahoot: Kahoot is a game-based learning platform that allows instructors to create games and quizzes for review that can be screenshared via Zoom or Teams synchronously, and promotes engagement. This is useful for spicing up any lecture.

PollEverywhere: PollEverywhere allows students to use their mobile phones or laptops to respond to polls synchronously or asynchronously. PollEverywhere is useful for gathering student feedback and has the potential to work well with larger class sizes.

 

Asynchronous Learning

Another way to conduct courses this semester is through asynchronous learning. Asynchronous learning is delivered via forums, videos, emails, and messages where students will complete lessons on their own, though typically with a set of weekly or daily due dates.

Similar to synchronous learning, asynchronous learning has both pros and cons. Synchronous learning is ideal for students who need a more flexible schedule and to avoid technical errors; however, students who lack motivation may discover that the low levels of interaction make completing work more difficult. Asynchronous learning and its success is largely dependent on the individual and their work ethic.

 

Video Recording
Panopto: Panopto is a software solution that allows the recording of audio/video content, as well as includes a web-based editor. It is useful for recording lectures that students can view on their own time, as well as for students to upload video submission of their work directly to the course.

 

Discussion Forums

Canvas: Canvas is a cloud-based learning management system that Butler adopted in Spring 2019. It has many tools that could be useful for teaching an asynchronous class. Discussion boards allow professors and students to “discuss” a lecture, offer feedback to other students, and share audio/video. Instructors can also grade Canvas discussions.

FlipGrid: Flipgrid is a website that allows teachers to create “grids” to host video discussions. Teachers can post questions or prompts which are called “topics,” and then students can post video responses that appear in the tiled grid display. It is useful for sharing videos that could be a response to an acting prompt, and allowing students to comment on each other’s performance utilizing videos.

Onenote Music Classroom: This resource acts as a hub for coursework. Assignments, quizzes, and lessons can be uploaded here and edited within the app.

 

Music Theory & Music History

Similar to music history, music theory is more accessible for online learning than performance based courses. However, it can be difficult to get access to physical materials and resources. The below links are resources that would help users gain access to tools which might help in music theory education.

Artusi: Interactive Musical Theory

MusicTheory.Net

Music Theory Examples and Women

Rising Software

Solfeg.io Music Instruction

UTheory.com

teoria: Music Theory Web

 

Tier 2: In-Person (Technique) Classes

Tier 2 courses include classes that involve performing in groups of two or more, and require equipment or in-person interactions.

AM 031/032, AM (212/412), AM221, AM 222, AM 226/426, AM 497, ME 191/192, ME 193, ME 291/292, ME 391/392, AM (secondary instrument) 

 

Some of the most important aspects of a music education is the ability to enhance technical skills and interact with other musicians in the process. However, due to the pandemic, the way this is done has drastically changed.

 

Technique Courses

Many of these courses require obtaining a specific instrument to practice on. While nearly impossible to require each student purchase their own instrument to participate in the course, there are some ways to reduce the amount of sharing between them.

  • Include a lesson on instrument hygiene and sharing etiquette.
  • Encourage or require (as a course material) that students buy their own mouthpiece, reeds, or cleaning supplies in preparation for using a school owned instrument. These are cheap and can be cleaned or replaced frequently.

 

Private Lessons

Forbes published a series of articles for aspiring performers and their instructors. As face-to-face instruction is difficult at this time, this series was designed to help students continue their private music lessons remotely. 

Conducting Successful Virtual Lessons

Preparing for Virtual Music Lessons

Continuing Online Music Lessons

Getting the Most from Virtual Music Lessons

 

Reduce Class Time

Obviously, a part of these classes require in person examination and work. However, divide the class into two and have students participate in a 50/50 setting. This way, only half the students will be in class at one time. This can be done by:

  • Finding the materials that can be done online, and those that must be done in person.
  • Utilize platforms such as Zoom, Panopto, and Canvas to record and share materials online.

Tier 3: Juries, Upper-Divisionals, and Recital Classes

Tier 3 courses are made up of courses taken as a “final exam” for performance majors. These often require a piano accompaniment, but can be recorded at home/in a recital hall, etc.

AM 299, AM 300, AM 400, Juries take place every semester there isn’t a recital or upper divisional

 

Despite the disappointing reality of no longer having access to resources that instructors typically would have, there are many ways to adapt production and technique classes to an online/remote format.

 

Performing Recitals and Juries

While the idea of performing to an empty room may appear odd, it could open many new opportunities for performing. 

 

Opening Butler’s Spaces: Butler has several performance spaces that can be utilized by students. These include the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall, Schrott Center for the Arts, and the Reiley Room. Other areas that could be used for performing could be the business building, areas in Clowes, or even the Fairview House community center. These spaces have enough room faculty to watch/grade the performance while social distancing.

Use Panopto: Panopto is a great resource to share videos of a performance or practice. The platform allows for multiple camera angles, providing more depth to the performance. This enhances the viewer’s experience, as well as increases the instructor’s ability to accurately observe and grade the student’s playing.

Obtaining Cameras: Several cameras and recording devices are available to students at the Irwin Library front desk and to faculty at the Center for Academic Technology. As well, many of the performance spaces are equipped with recording capabilities. 

 

More Recital Resources

Recitals are an integral part of music evaluations. The following blogs provide ideas and resources for how students are able to put on recitals despite social distancing rules. 

How to Host an Online Recital

Online Recital Ideas

Getting Creative with Online Recitals

Panopto- Music Recital Lecture

 

Interviews for Upperdivisionals

Some parts of the education upperdivisional require students to participate in an interview. These can be done online through a variety of platforms.

Zoom: Zoom is a web-based communication technology that has the capacity to conduct video conferencing, annotate meetings, facilitate breakout rooms, and can record and download meetings. It supports both audio and video.

Hangouts: Hangouts is a unified communication system, similar to Zoom, that allows members to initiate and participate in text, voice or video chats. It can be used on both iOS and Android devices.

Teams: Microsoft Teams can be blended directly into your Canvas course and allows students to be able to meet similarly to Zoom.

Tier 4: Group Work

Tier 4 courses are classes that involve heavy group participation.

ES (WE or BSO)

 

These courses require in-person interaction with other students and faculty. Unfortunately, many ensembles are unable to meet through online communication technology to perform as the sound quality will not match. Not all parts will be heard equally. However, these platforms can be used to encourage a different style of learning.

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Zoom: Zoom is a web-based communication technology that has the capacity to conduct video conferencing, annotate meetings, facilitate breakout rooms, and can record and download meetings. It supports both audio and video.

Teams: Microsoft Teams can be blended directly into your Canvas course and allows students to be able to meet similarly to Zoom.

 

Virtual Performances

  • Many ensembles have moved to making virtual performances. This skill is important as it allows students to develop new abilities, such as:
    • Playing to a click track
    • Recording with good audio quality
    • Combining videos (often through GarageBandMixcraftProTools, etc.) to make ensembles come together
  • The performers could also connect with the Music Industries Studies students to get professional recording help in a small setting
  • There are limitations to this as it requires a good deal of time and effort and the songs are limited to a single tempo
  • Check out the Butler Symphony Orchestra performing Elgar's "Nimrod"

 

Online Discussions

  • Master Classes: Provide students with the ability to participate and watch a master class with a member of the faculty. This is a great way to stay connected, share music, and encourage learning among every participant. This can be done through a variety of online streaming services such as Zoom.
  • Watch and Analyze Performances: Have students watch and analyze performances at other universities and orchestras around the world. This information can be used later in their performances.
  • Analyze the Score: Scores and books on the work and composer can often be obtained from the university library and shared among students. Then they will explore the details and history of the score and its composer. This information will be beneficial to the student when they perform the work or other works by the composer.
  • Provide Playing Assessments: These can be set up through Canvas and used to teach the student how they might play an important passage. Read this article on Getting Superior Adjudication to learn more.

CONTACT

Email Butler University Libraries
Irwin Library: 317-940-9227
Science Library: 317-940-9937
CAT: 317-940-8575

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